Biological activity and the Earth's surface evolution: Insights from carbon, sulfur, nitrogen and iron stable isotopes in the rock record | INSTITUT DE PHYSIQUE DU GLOBE DE PARIS

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  Biological activity and the Earth's surface evolution: Insights from carbon, sulfur, nitrogen and iron stable isotopes in the rock record

Publication Type:

Journal Article

Source:

Comptes Rendus Palevol, Volume 8, Issue 7, p.665-678 (2009)

ISBN:

1631-0683

Accession Number:

ISI:000273271900007

URL:

http://www.sciencedirect.com/science/article/pii/S163106830900102X

Keywords:

UMR 7154 ; Géobiosphère actuelle et primitive ; Isotopes; Biosignature; Carbon; Nitrogen; Sulfur; Iron; Mass independent fractionation; Archean ; Isotopes stables; Biosignature; Carbone; Azote; Soufre; Fer; Archéen

Abstract:

The search for early Earth biological activity is hindered by the scarcity of the rock record. The very few exposed sedimentary rocks have all been affected by secondary processes such as metamorphism and weathering, which might have distorted morphological microfossils and biogenic minerals beyond recognition and have altered organic matter to kerogen. The search for biological activity in such rocks therefore relies entirely on chemical, molecular or isotopic indicators. A powerful toot used for this purpose is the stable isotope signature of elements related to life (C, N, S, Fe). It provides key informations not only on the metabolic pathways operating at the time of the sediment deposition, but more globally on the biogeochemical cycling of these elements and thus on the Earth's surface evolution. Here, we review the basis of stable isotope biogeochemistry for these isotopic systems. Rather than an exhaustive approach, we address some examples to illustrate how they can be used as biosignatures of early life and as proxies for its environment, while keeping in mind what their limitations are. We then focus on the covariations among these isotopic systems during the Archean time period to show that they convey important information both on the evolution of the redox state of the terrestrial surface reservoirs and on co-occurring ecosystems in the Archean. To cite this article: C. Thomazo et al., C R. Palevol 8 (2009). (C) 2009 Academie des sciences. Published by Elsevier Masson SAS. All rights reserved.

Notes:

Thomazo, Christophe Pinti, Daniele L. Busigny, Vincent Ader, Magali Hashizume, Ko Philippot, Pascal