Equatorially asymmetric convection inducing a hemispherical magnetic field in rotating spheres and implications for the past martian dynamo | INSTITUT DE PHYSIQUE DU GLOBE DE PARIS

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  Equatorially asymmetric convection inducing a hemispherical magnetic field in rotating spheres and implications for the past martian dynamo

Type de publication:

Journal Article

Source:

Physics of the Earth and Planetary Interiors, Volume 185, Ticket 3-4, p.61-73 (2011)

ISBN:

0031-9201

Numéro d'accès:

WOS:000289926000001

URL:

Cited by in Scopus (1)

Mots-clés:

UMR 7154 ; Dynamique des Fluides géologiques ; N° Contribution : 3086

Résumé:

<p>The convective instability in a rapidly rotating, self-graviting sphere sets up in the form of equatorially symmetric, non-axisymmetric columnar vortices aligned with the rotation axis, carrying heat away in the cylindrical radial direction. In this study, we present numerical simulations of thermal convection and dynamo action driven by internal heating (intended to model a planetary core subject to uniform secular cooling) in a rotating sphere where, from the classical columnar convection regime, we find a spontaneous transition towards an unexpected and previously unobserved flow regime in which an equatorially antisymmetric, axisymmetric (EAA) mode strongly influences the flow. This EAA mode carries heat away along the rotation axis and is the nonlinear manifestation of the first linearly unstable axisymmetric mode. When the amplitude of the EAA mode reaches high enough values, we obtain hemispherical dynamos with one single hemisphere bearing more than 75% of the total magnetic energy at the surface of the rotating sphere. We perform the linear analysis of the involved convective modes and the nonlinear study of this hydrodynamic transition, with and without dynamo action, to obtain scaling laws for the regime boundaries. As secular cooling in a full sphere (i.e. without inner core) is a configuration which has probably been widespread in the early solar system in planetary cores, including the core of Mars, we discuss the possible implications of our results for the past martian dynamo. (C) 2011 Elsevier B.V. All rights reserved.</p>

Notes:

Landeau, Maylis Aubert, Julien