TriTel-S: Development of a complex dosimetry instrument for a satellite in geostationary transfer orbit | INSTITUT DE PHYSIQUE DU GLOBE DE PARIS

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  TriTel-S: Development of a complex dosimetry instrument for a satellite in geostationary transfer orbit

Type de publication:

Journal Article

Source:

Radiation Measurements, Volume 43, Ticket 2-6, p.427-431 (2008)

ISBN:

1350-4487

Numéro d'accès:

WOS:000257808000064

Mots-clés:

Sismologie, UMR 7154

Résumé:

One of the many risks of long-duration space flights is the excessive exposure to cosmic radiation, which may have serious consequences particularly during solar flares and higher solar activity. Since space radiation mainly consists of charged heavy particles, the equivalent dose differs significantly from the absorbed dose. The objectives of this project, which began in the KFKI Atomic Energy Research Institute of the Hungarian Academy of Sciences several years ago, are to develop a three-dimensional silicon detector telescope (TriTel) and to develop software for data evaluation of the measured energy deposition spectra. A version of TriTel will be installed onboard a European satellite (ESEO) in a highly eccentric orbit crossing, the Van Allen belts. The instrument will encounter high fluxes of trapped electron radiation in a considerable part of the orbit. In order to give a rough estimate of the expected fluxes and spectra of protons and electrons in orbit, calculations were made with the Space Environment Information System (SPENVIS) online tool. The number of electron coincidences and the deposited energy spectra of electrons were calculated with the Monte Carlo simulation-based software MUlti-LAyered Shielding Simulation Software (MULASSIS). The description of the instrument, the expected environment in orbit and the evaluation of the results of the preliminary simulations are discussed in this paper. (C) 2008 Elsevier Ltd. All rights reserved.

Notes:

15th International Conference on Solid State Dosimetry JUL 08-13, 2007 Delft Univ Technol, Delft, NETHERLANDS