Multi-element stable isotopic dilution and multi-surface modelling to assess the speciation and reactivity of cadmium and copper in soil. | INSTITUT DE PHYSIQUE DU GLOBE DE PARIS

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  Multi-element stable isotopic dilution and multi-surface modelling to assess the speciation and reactivity of cadmium and copper in soil.

Type de publication:

Journal Article

Source:

Volume 66, Ticket 6, p.973 (Soumis)

ISBN:

13510754

URL:

http://search.ebscohost.com/login.aspx?direct=true&site=eds-live&db=a9h&AN=110674103

Mots-clés:

CADMIUM in soils, COPPER in soils, ISOTOPE dilution analysis, MANGANESE oxides, SOIL classification, STABLE isotopes

Résumé:

Chemical extraction, multi-element stable isotopic dilution ( ID) and multi-surface modelling were used to investigate the lability of cadmium ( Cd) and copper ( Cu) in nine types of soil with different properties and contaminated or not with Cd and Cu. The chemical extraction and ID analyses both showed that Cd was more labile than Cu in all the soil types studied. From the ID results, 32.8-93.3% of total Cd and 14.7-71.8% of total Cu were isotopically exchangeable after 3 days of equilibration. A single extraction in 0.43 m HNO3 gave similar results to the 3-day ID assay for Cu in most of the soils and for Cd in the non-calcareous soils. However, an eight-step selective sequential extraction ( SSE) procedure gave different results from the ID assay for both metals. Predictions of the multi-surface model for the amounts of Cd and Cu adsorbed, based on measured metal ion activities in the soil solution and the concentrations of reactive surfaces in the soil, agreed with the ID results. The model predicted that soil organic matter was the predominant sorbent for Cd and Cu in the soils and that manganese oxide was the least important sorbent. The contributions of iron oxides to sorption were predicted to be small except in soil with a high pH and little organic matter. The predicted sorption on different soil components did not match SSE measurements. [ABSTRACT FROM AUTHOR]<i>Copyright of European Journal of Soil Science is the property of Wiley-Blackwell and its content may not be copied or emailed to multiple sites or posted to a listserv without the copyright holder's express written permission. However, users may print, download, or email articles for individual use. This abstract may be abridged. No warranty is given about the accuracy of the copy. Users should refer to the original published version of the material for the full abstract.</i> (Copyright applies to all Abstracts.)